Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra (Theme from Movement I)


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Both Rubinstein brothers thought very highly of the young Tchaikovsky, and Nikolay actually the conducted the premieres of a great many of his works: the first four symphonies, Eugene Onegin , Romeo and Juliet , Marche Slave , the Capriccio italien , and the Rococo Variations. Tchaikovsky certainly planned his first piano concerto especially for Nikolay, intending that he should receive the dedication and play the solo part in the first performance.

It was not to be. On Christmas Eve of , Tchaikovsky took the manuscript to Rubinstein to ask him about some technical details of the keyboard writing. He played through the first movement and received only stony silence. I am no longer a boy trying his hand at composition and I no longer need lessons from anyone, especially when they are offered so harshly and in such a spirit of hostility.


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Tchaikovsky evidently asked him to premiere it as far from Russia as possible, in case it should fail utterly. The distinguished Boston composer George W. The Tchaikovsky concerto has long since become so popular that we forget how striking a work it is.

Tchaikovsky surely did not calculate all these relationships in rational or mathematical ways. It is more likely that his mind was whirling with these gestures and that they coalesced in various ways satisfying to his inner ear. They are, in any case, quite subtle, but they set the stage suitably for the main body of the movement. Tchaikovsky finds imaginative solutions to the formal demands, too—even though he never believed that he had sufficient mastery of form, despite that fact that he regularly outshone his Russian colleagues precisely in the matter of musical architecture.

It is, surprisingly, in the relative major of D-flat, not the home key of B-flat minor.


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The main theme that follows is a Ukrainian folk song, but Tchaikovsky is not so much concerned with investigating Russian folklore as he is interested here in the dramatic opposition of soloist and orchestra. The second theme is a poignant Tchaikovskyan melody with a gently rocking accompaniment familiar from his earlier Romeo and Juliet.

concerto | Definition, History, & Examples | Britannica

This happens to begin with the notes D-flat and A. The second movement combines elements of both a slow movement and a scherzo. The slow part features a flute melody with a reply by the soloist. For his finale, Tchaikovsky concentrates on the effective alternation of his materials, the first theme another Ukrainian folk song, and the second a tranquil string melody. He began to sketch the Symphony No.

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The score calls for three flutes one doubling piccolo , three oboes, three clarinets, three bassoons, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, and strings. There are two sets of timpani and two players, the second stationed opposite the first. Duration is about 36 minutes. Carl Nielsen grew up in a rural environment and from early childhood developed a love of the natural world and a remarkably insightful perception of human beings and their role in the world.

Though he had artistic leanings to both the visual arts and literature, his musical gift was even stronger. It was discovered early because his father played violin and cornet as a much sought-after village musician. His mother sang him simple songs, and he learned to imitate them, at the age of six, on a small violin.

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By nine he had become part of an amateur orchestra, thus extending his horizons to orchestral dance movements and a few symphonic excerpts from Haydn and Mozart. His First Symphony revealed a strong Brahmsian influence, but his Second, The Four Temperaments , was already wonderfully personal, characteristic. To many of his symphonies he gave a title, intended to suggest the general character and no more. The Third Symphony, for example, begins undeniably in D minor, but it ends in A major; throughout its entire course, Nielsen sets up conflicts of tonality that eventually resolve in the latter key.

The concerto

He was by no means blind to the situation along the hundreds of miles of trench warfare, where one side might gain a few yards today only to lose them next month—and both advances and retreats taking an appalling waste in the lives of young men from Germany, France, Belgium and England. No, in Danish the title is in the neuter, and it refers to that which is inextinguishable in human life and in the world of nature.

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In the Third Symphony, Nielsen had cast the music into the standard four movements, with a break between them. Following the wise decision to combine piano and orchestra, Brahms recast the opening as the first movement of a piano concerto; the other movements of the sonata were discarded although one of them reappeared later in the composer's German Requiem. A jaunty new finale was completed in late , followed by the radiant slow movement, but the composer continued to make adjustments up to and even beyond the first performances of the Concerto in January Considering the intensity of the work, it may not be so surprising that a critic wrote of the second performance, in Leipzig, that the Concerto "cannot give pleasure," lamenting that it contained "the shrillest dissonances and most unpleasant sounds.

The Maestoso first movement opens with a mighty noise: as clarinets, bassoons, timpani, violas, and basses sustain an ominous pedal note, violins and cellos declaim the melody with stabbing accents and menacing trills. Before long the other winds are added to the violent assault, but then an espressivo variant lends an air of melancholy, with the theme eventually rising to an exalted register in the first violins.

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Another outburst, with horns reinforcing the theme, subsides again to make way for the solo piano, which enters with what must be one of the most understated thematic statements in the entire concerto literature. There is a hushed, hesitant, almost stuttering quality, all the more surprising when we know that this very same solo will soon gather up its courage and challenge the orchestra with its own ferocious statement of those menacing trills. As thematic materials are traded back and forth during the plus minutes of this movement, we can only marvel at how well-suited each element seems, both to the orchestra and to the keyboard.

After the earthly struggles that mark the first movement, the Adagio is, quite literally, a world away. There is a devotional aspect to the music that most likely reflects the composer's appreciation of the "ancient" masters e. Clara herself noted the movement's "spiritual" quality.

Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra  (Theme from Movement I) Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra (Theme from Movement I)
Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra  (Theme from Movement I) Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra (Theme from Movement I)
Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra  (Theme from Movement I) Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra (Theme from Movement I)
Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra  (Theme from Movement I) Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra (Theme from Movement I)
Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra  (Theme from Movement I) Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra (Theme from Movement I)
Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra  (Theme from Movement I) Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra (Theme from Movement I)
Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra  (Theme from Movement I) Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra (Theme from Movement I)
Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra  (Theme from Movement I) Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra (Theme from Movement I)
Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra (Theme from Movement I)

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